Eight Waters

The natural samples from left to right 1-8

The natural samples from left to right 1-8

The natural samples from left to right 1-4

The natural samples from left to right 1-4

The natural samples from left to right 5-8

The natural samples from left to right 5-8

The  samples from left to right 1-4 with universal pH indicator added. The red/orange and yellow colours reveal  various degrees of acidity.

The samples from left to right 1-4 with universal pH indicator added. The red/orange and yellow colours reveal various degrees of acidity.

The  samples from left to right 1-4 with universal pH indicator added. The red/orange and yellow colours reveal  various degrees of acidity.

The samples from left to right 1-4 with universal pH indicator added. The red/orange and yellow colours reveal various degrees of acidity.

The  samples from left to right 5-8 with universal pH indicator added. The  green/blue colours  reveal  neutrality and alkalinity.

The samples from left to right 5-8 with universal pH indicator added. The green/blue colours reveal neutrality and alkalinity.

The  samples from left to right 1-4 with universal pH indicator added. The red/orange and yellow colours reveal  various degrees of acidity.

The samples from left to right 1-4 with universal pH indicator added. The red/orange and yellow colours reveal various degrees of acidity.

I have a new project with artist Sarah Craske that seeks to explore the nature of water. The chemical properites of pure water are universal, and unchanging,  and what gives natural water courses their identify and unique characteristics is what exists within it and between the spaces of its polar molecules. The project seeks to reveal these defining elemental signatures. The images here are from tests for processes for the project. They reveal natural differences in the colour and turbity of different waters and after the addition of a universal pH indicator striking differences in pH. Here are the waters:

  1. Brown and  tannic  pool,  Shatterford, New Forest
  2. Red muddy ferric  pool, Shatterford, New Forest
  3. Brown and tannic pool, Shatterford, New Forest
  4. Brown and tannic pool, Shatterford, New Forest
  5. Beaulieu River water, Bucklers Hard, New Forest
  6. Seawater, Lepe Beach, New Forest
  7. River Itchen water, Tumbling Pool, Twyford
  8. Thames River water, Trinity Buoy Wharf, London

The next step in the process is to convert the waters into gels by adding agar. This will allow the water to removed, allowing their characteristic and defining chemical signatures to be captured in a thin and transparent agar film.

Droplets of pure water as extracted from the various  samples. Water is the carrier for the unique chemical signatures that define the various water courses. Pretty but it is the residue left behind by water's absence that will make the art work.

Droplets of pure water as extracted from the various samples. Water is the carrier for the unique chemical signatures that define the various water courses. Pretty but it is the residue left behind by water’s absence that will make the art work.

Droplets of pure water as extracted from the various  samples. Water is the carrier for the unique chemical signatures that define the various water courses. Pretty but it is the residue left behind by water's absence that will make the art work.

Droplets of pure water as extracted from the various samples. Water is the carrier for the unique chemical signatures that define the various water courses. Pretty but it is the residue left behind by water’s absence that will make the art work.

Droplets of pure water as extracted from the various  samples. Water is the carrier for the unique chemical signatures that define the various water courses. Pretty but it is the residue left behind by water's absence that will make the art work.

Droplets of pure water as extracted from the various samples. Water is the carrier for the unique chemical signatures that define the various water courses. Pretty but it is the residue left behind by water’s absence that will make the art work.

The waters converted into firm agar gels ready for the dehydration process

The waters converted into firm agar gels ready for the dehydration process

2 thoughts on “Eight Waters

  1. Pingback: Eight Waters | Celia Wilson

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