Photorhabdus species: optimizing bioluminescence

Optimized bioluminescence in Photorhabdus asymbiotica (top) and Photorhabdus luminescencs (bottom)

Optimized bioluminescence in Photorhabdus asymbiotica (top) and Photorhabdus luminescencs (bottom)

37 C, no added carbon source, 1% glucose, 1% glycerol

37 C, no added carbon source, 1% glucose, 1% glycerol

30 C, no added carbon source, 1% glucose, 1% glycerol

30 C, no added carbon source, 1% glucose, 1% glycerol

25 C, no added carbon source, 1% glucose, 1% glycerol

25 C, no added carbon source, 1% glucose, 1% glycerol

20 C, no added carbon source, 1% glucose, 1% glycerol

20 C, no added carbon source, 1% glucose, 1% glycerol

Before art there is always science. These are experiments to optimize light output in the bioluminescent bacteria Photorahbdus asymbiotica and Photorhabdus luminescens  by changing the incubation temperature, and by adding various carbon sources to the media. The effect of temperature is dramatic. Incubation at  37 C, also human body temperature, results in the best light production. Also the colonies are brightest without any additional carbon source and thus the carbon sources used here at least repress light output.  Unlike the bioluminescent marine bacteria such as Photobacterium phosphoreum, the light produced by the Photorhabdus species here is stable at higher temperatures and does not require the addition of high concentrations of salt and offers alternative artistic applications.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s