About

Welcome to Exploring the Invisible, my biological playground.  I’m a scientist artist who works with living matter in order to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives.  I am unlike many  artists though, as I choose not to impose any strict human-centred design upon nature, and prefer to evoke it as a co-author in the creative process. My hope is that my works will allow the interested observer to perceive biological phenomena that would otherwise be perpetually invisible, so that the hidden machinations of the natural world are brought to light. I also want the site to act as a catalyst that promotes collaborations with artists, so if you see something you like, and would like to use in your own work, please get in touch.

35 thoughts on “About

  1. Hi there. I am looking for a hardback volume of micro shots similar to yours, perhaps extended to virus etc. I am interested in close ups becoming abstraction as a source of inspiration. So far, I drawn a blank. Any help would be appreciated. S

  2. I am very impressed with the work that you have posted here. The way you present these biological phenomena and provide commentary on the character that each of the organisms possess is intriguing. So much so, in fact, that it has inspired me to learn more. I really appreciate what you are doing here and I hope to see more.

  3. Hi there,
    I just stumbled across this page and I’m mighty excited about it! I’m a practising Surface Designer (student), and I’m currently working with bacterias and moulds. I want to know much more about you work and methods. I need advice on growing bacterias effectively (and safely). Where abouts in the world are you based? And do you have any exhibition type shows or spaces that are open to the public? I am so intrigued by your work, I want to know everything!

    Regards
    Joanna

  4. Dear Simon,
    I’m a PhD student at UC Davis studying plant Science. I also teach intro bio here as well as art science fusion class. I also make my own artwork using bacteria and fungi. Your work is amazing! Do you take interested learners? I’m almost done with my PhD :)
    Any way we could skype? I really want to learn more! I feel as though I found a kindred spirit!
    -Anna

    • Thanks Anna, I’d love to see your own bacterial/fungal artwork. I don’t have much money to fund my art and science but if you’re ever over in the UK I’d be happy to introduce you to the lab etc. More than happy to chat about my projects. Email works best for me. Best wishes, Simon

  5. Simon — my name is Nicole Bogart, tech reporter with Global News in Toronto. I am interested in doing a piece about the cell phone bacteria art seen here. If possible, please contact me as soon as possible.

  6. Dear Simon, I’d like to make a short news item about the phone bacteria for a Dutch science news website. If you would permit us to use those images, that would be great. Please get in touch.

  7. Are Antimicrobial solutions for Phones, touch-devices, keyboards/mice TV Remotes, light switches, elevator buttons, car steering wheels, handles etc… being supported by Infectious Control Practitioners? Are you supportive of the idea? Do you want manufactures to produce products with antimicrobial properties?

  8. Hello! I’m currently undergoing an art-science collaboration project creating an installation with bioluminescent bacterial and sculpture. We are using Vibrio fisheri.

    Are you able to share a bit about your culturing methods, and how you got the optimal levels of luminescence? I must admit I have not heard of the glycerine trick! Could you tell me more?

  9. hello there
    You’re images are amazing. Am I able to buy any prints from you somehow?
    many thanks, Alex

  10. Hi there,
    The microbe collections are really beautiful!! Especially those colorful bacteria and the fungi with special growth patterns on the agar plates. I’m a graduate student working in some project about the bacteria and fungi, though they look not as beautiful as yours. A small query here, do you think these artworks painted with the bacteria be long-term maintained? I mean will the colors still be there even after the bacteria are killed, or they will just disappear?
    Thank you for sharing so many beautiful pictures:)

  11. Hi there,
    The microbe collections are really beautiful!! Especially those colorful bacteria and the fungi with special growth patterns on the agar plates. I’m a graduate student working in some project about the bacteria and fungi, though they look not as beautiful as yours. A small query here, do you think these artworks painted with the bacteria be long-term maintained? I mean will the colors still be there even after the bacteria are killed, or they will just disappear?
    Thank you for sharing so many beautiful pictures:)

    • Hello, thank you for your kind words. The colours persist long after the bacteria have died. Some of the pigments are quite sensitive to light though and we sometimes use special glass to protect them. Best wishes, Simon

  12. Hello Simon, I am the editor of the online edition ‘a glimpse of’ which brings together works from a number of diverse creative fields in order to generate unpredictable narratives. I’d like to invite you to participate at Issue 14, The Sphinx Wants Me to Guess: http://aglimpseof.net/category/issue-14/ Best. Dimitra

      • Hi Simon, you may contribute with a previous unpublished work (text, image) in relation to a word or phrase found at the source-text ‘The Sphinx Wants Me to Guess.”
        Please read the Instructons, and, if you like, contact me at aglimpseofnet@gmail.com.
        Best wishes, Dimitra

  13. My name is Lucie Libotte, I come from Belgium and I am currently studying at Central St Martins in MA Future Textile. ( http://www.textilefutures.co.uk/).
    This course explore several subject that incorporate new materials and designs that might help for a future in our environment.

    I am contacting you cause for my final year, I decide to work around House Dust into a material.

    Further into my research now i have two directions, one of this two research,
    will be looking at what is inside of home dust and try to work around its materiality.
    Like dead cells, dust mite, textile fibers and several minerals, depending of the history of the area of our house.

    And the other direction will be looking at how can I design something around home dust which can be use and be accepted in our environment that can have a impact into our everyday life as something that we reject, which always come back to us.

    I have been all ready working around different materiality and observation, house dust powder to maybe construct a design or a material.

    So for what I have got so far is per year, in UK houses we collect +- 18.14 kg of home dust per house.

    Because I saw that you have been doing a project around dust, i was wondering if you could be able to discuss about your project or drive me to someone that can help me to have a bit more information about it, for me to understand better that field and how it works to help me to progress into my own development.

    Kind Regard

    • Hi Lucie

      Thanks for your interest in my work. I’d be happy to talk about dust. Here’s my email (s.park@surrey.ac.uk).

      I’m talking to Zuzana whom I think is also on your course about her prject too!

      Best wishes

      Simon

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